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blinking stoplight and no movie theaters. so religion was what people did. everyone went to church, and my father was far more conservative than the average person in the town. we were not permitted to wear pants, shorts, no alcohol, no dancing, no musical instruments in our church of christ. in lots of ways i was quiet at home in saudi arabia. [laughter] i devoted my time to trying to figure this country out precisely because i think it is the one arab country that is truly strategic. not only because it is the world's largest exporter of oil, which sustains the western way of life, but because saudi arabia, i am convinced, will be critical in the ultimate resolution of what is the proper islam which is going on now between the radicals, jihadists if you will, and the more modernizing muslims. and that very battle also goes on inside saudi arabia. to try to understand this society, i knew you would like someone coming to to write a book about america, you wouldn't be able to go to washington and new york and claim to understand america. so i had to be confident that i could get outside of
schools catholic, if you'll treat catholicism as the state religion of italy, then we'll set up a concordance with you, and you'll give us the status of a separate country. the van can is a separate country. it doesn't have any normal citizens, you know, no women citizens. it's got post offices and other signs of the government, but it's a fake government. it's a fantasy government. you know, it's kind of a disneyland government. [laughter] nobodiments to take -- nobody wants to take it away. my wife refused to go to the vatican after the first few times. it's got beautiful treasures in there, but it's a great fortress is great treasures inside, and everywhere, paintings of the donation of con stan tine, the mystical giving of worldly power to the pope, painting on chairs of the bishop peter, which he never was, coats of arms of all of the noble popes who took over in the renaissance, and she said, you know, what could be more against the gospel of jesus than this earthly trumpeting of power and pride? it's not going to go away, but as i say, we really should start treating it w
, lynne olson recounts world war ii. jeff chu presents his thoughts on religion and gay rights in "does jesus really love me: a gay christian's pilgrimage in search of god in america." in "forecast: what physics, meetology and science can teach us," mark buchanan explains how the ebb and flow of markets and the economy can relate to numerous fields of science. look for these titles in bookstores this coming week and watch for the authors in the near future on booktv and booktv.org. >> betty friedan's "the feminine mystique" was published in 963. it's a book that would play an integral role on feminism in the united states. a panel discusses the impact of the book 50 years after its publication. this is a little over an hour. >> um, well, first i want to
, for religion or whatever. if they miss use it the laws tell you if you violate the laws you should be punished. >> the laws have caught up with this technology. >> that is the issue we should be discussing, the technology that exists today, not the delivery system. >> our laws need to be as sophisticated as the people who are potentially breaking them. that is where we are headed. thank you very much. >> senator cruz. >> thank you, mr. chairman and will witnesses for testifying today. it seems to me drones are a technological pull. as with most schools can be used productively or can be abused. when we think about conduct overseas, in particular in counterterrorism, drones have proven an effective tool in certain circumstances and particularly have enabled us to deal with terrorists without placing service men and women directly in harm's way. at the same time it seems to me that oversees our conduct needs to be consistent with the laws of war. domestically in the united states, our conduct in all circumstances knees to be consistent with the constitution. and how that applies to drone surveil
of religion or faith and that causes the tradition and women to the to be limited or the girl or a child not to be sent to school and therefore we issued a strong statement of the elders about three years ago now saying that the leaders should champion the quality of girls and women that should be part of their spirituality and their faith and most of them are men. [applause] and then we said that's all very well but what are we going to do practically? and that brought us to the early child marriage issue and because marriage isn't a private thing it is sanctioned in some religious way and therefore it was a good example. i was aware of the expense of this in certain countries but by and large we underestimated and the archbishop is honest about saying that he totally underestimated the numbers that we are talking about. 10 million girls a year. that is 100 million girls in a decade or married without their consent, and very often without their knowledge on today itself way before they are ready for it physically or emotionally. we went to ethiopia where blah, -- the blah is and they we
christ-- not a religion, not a denomination, not a philosophy, but a person. and this book that he wrote, he only wrote one-- i have to do nine and keep at it until i get it right-- but has been embraced by millions through the ages and people of different racial, ethnic, genders, philosophies, and political parties. he is the only person who ever claimed to be god, and to prove it by rising from the dead and to have changed the lives of billions of people throughout the history of the world. it is a book that is self- authenticating. you read it, you understand it to be true. most people, though, haven't read it. they think "god helps those who help themselves" is in the bible, and "separation of church and state" is in the constitution. neither is true. >> let me ask you again, though, how sure are you that this is absolute? i mean, they're words on paper. >> i'm so sure, i'd stake my life on it. you can't make a better investment than that. >> you've got a quote in here about liberals, and i can't-- i'll find it here in just a second. i know-- maybe you can remember how you define lib
accomplished in india. we studied the role of disobedience and we studied the great religions of the world. and when it was time for the young people to sit in, we did. many of us use nonviolence not simply as a technique or but it as a way of life in the way of living. we wanted as dr. king was there the soul of america to create a beloved community. you heard in the introduction i did get arrested a few times. 40 times. during the 60s but since i've been in congress i got arrested four more times around the issues of south africa and around what was going on in sudan. but we never gave up during those days. we never gave in. them. we never gave out in spite of being beaten, left bloody and unconscious, having a concussion on that ridge. i still believe in the power of love. i still believe that somehow and some way we can overcome. we can create one community, one family, one house if we all live in the same house. not just an american house but the world house. it doesn't matter we are there we are lack, white latino asian-america or native american we must stay with our house and hold
. many of them are in the bill of rights. freedom of speech, religion, assembly, the press, the right to keep and bear arms -- [cheers and applause] i can't think of any of these at point that aren't under assault by a bunch of leftists that want to deconstruct america. and that does offend me. and so i think it's our job to step up and defend our values and defend the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism. i'll stand there with all of the people that want to rebrand the republican party to work on the economic side of this agenda, but i invite all of them to cover -- come over with all of us to work together on the full spectrum of constitutional conservativism including life and marriage and the rule of law. [applause] and on the life question, it's really pretty simple. i went through the toughest election of my life last fall. i had tracking cameras around me from st. patrick's day until november 6th, one to three cameras always focused on me trying to get a second or a minute that they could run against me in an ad. they didn't get a single second that they could run aga
. to stand with us on freedom of speech and freedom of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad
that protects speech and religion but it protects association, it protects people coming together and making things happen in their community that wouldn't happen otherwise. americans give to these things like nobody else would every day. our religious institutions, our charities, our hospitals, our museums and others come together to take private resources and meet a number of community needs that are met in the best possible way by people who are doing that through a charitable effort. feeding the hungry, caring for the sick, serving the poor, educational institutions of all kinds undertaking critical research, money that goes to either help operate or actually support museums and parks. these are all the kinds of things that americans do because they give to charity. now, these things are so often done better than government bureaucracies would achieve this goal. cheaper, more effectively, more reasonably and -- and we need to do everything we can to continue to do that. in 2011, americans gave nearly $300 billion to charitable causes. 75% of that giving is done by individuals. of the 41
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10

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